Archive for Making A Murderer

‘The Case Against Steven Avery and What Making a Murderer Gets Wrong’ by K.KRatz

Posted in Crap Books Never To read Again, Criminal, drugs, Making A Murderer, Reviews, Revisionism, Worst Books, YPJ with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 29, 2017 by The Plough & The Stars

kratz book

I approached the dread task of reading this book with the unprejudiced objectivity that was sadly lacking in Manitowoc County’s District Attorney’s Office during King Kratz’s infamous reign.  I would stress that even though the most casual research suggests that KRatz is an internationally hated figure, due to his alleged penchant for serious ethical violations, including but not limited to perjury; fabricating evidence; crimes against the poor and vulnerable; which are compounded by an alleged myriad of many, many other despicably craven acts.  I did not let my research of this alleged fiend prejudice my approach to KkKRatz’ self-proclaimed literary opus.

The foreword by internationally despised, reactionary cretin, Nancy Grace, proved an accurate signpost to the dire literary journey I was about to endure.   Sadly, any reasonable person’s thoughts after reading a quarter way through the book will be whether they can get a refund.  By midway through, a reader will begin to wonder did Hydrocodone have a guiding hand in KKRatz’ wordsmithing?  The seriously lengthy inventory of deepseated resentments towards people, places and things KKRatz spews out was impossible to ignore.  Around the the same point in reading KKRatz’s book one may experience an arcane revelation as to the true meaning of the term ‘vanity publishing.’

 
The only vaguely useful section of this Penny Dreadful is that it allows one to understand the psychopathy of the author.  One will instantly indentify parallels with the kind of mind that could concoct that detailed, graphic and grizly yet totally false account of T Hallbach’s demise at KKRatz’s infamously prejudicial press conference documented in the Netflix series.

 
By the time one has finished this highly narcissistic, polemical potboiler there will be real proof of KKRatz’s criminality as he is guilty of pickpotting the reader of £16 ($20).  On surfacing after the dive into this nadir of the lowest circuit of the literary sewer one may well immediately feel the need to take a shower.  There is absolutely nothing positive to state about the experience of reading KkKRatz’s Kampf except that positively nobody should ever be foolish enough to pay money for this bound myre of bile, fiction and nonsense.  However, if one has resisted the temptation to decant it swiftly into a neighbour’s bin, it may actually be worth keeping as a reference of sorts due to forthcoming legal developments….

By Alex McGuigan

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Illusion of Justice: Inside Making A Murderer and America’s Broken System by Jerry Buting

Posted in Making A Murderer, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 26, 2017 by The Plough & The Stars

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Jerry Buting’s Illusion of Justice: Inside Making a Murderer and America’s Broken System should be compulsory reading for all US citizens.  It is important reading by virtue of the fact that one in ten US citizens are currently incarcerated, via that broken system, in the security-industrial complex’s ever growing Gulag Archipelago.  Jerry’s book is not simply a one-dimensional insider view of the groundbreaking Making a Murderer docu-series that made most of us angry and appalled at the blatant miscarriage of justice visited upon Steven Avery, despite the best efforts of his erudite, indomitable lawyers, Jerry Buting and Dean Strang.  However, any fan of the Netflix docus-eries will find it invaluable reading, revealing many crucial details that did not make it onto the series, not least the near pugilistic meeting in Judge Willis’ chambers with one of the real villains of the piece, District Attorney Ken Kratz.

Jerry Buting’s Illusion of Justice is in part biographical, part case studies, including those of Steve Avery and Brendan Dassey and of others who were hastily arrested, then subsequently convicted on the most dubious of evidence and the long, hard struggle to prove their innocence.  Interwoven throughout each compelling thread from the first Uppercase letter to the last Period is Jerry’s very rational, very compelling indictment of the USA’s criminal justice system:

“So many courts and officials ducked their duties and kept these men incarcerated that we are only kidding ourselves if we say that these cases prove the system fixes it’s own mistakes.  That is the illusion of justice.”

One does not need any personal experience or direct link to the criminal law system to understand Jerry’s thesis in Illusion of Justice as it is very much legalese-free, with what little legal terminology used being adequately explained by the author.  The reader may come away feeling that their misplaced faith in the equity of the Judicial component of their Government has been rocked, while others may have their own bleak experiences within the so-called justice system very much affirmed.  Every reasonable person, irrespective of jurisdiction, will have no doubt after reading Illusion of Justice that the book’s title is tragically apt and that Jerry is a proactive advocate for the rights of the wretched of the earth who by lack of means are overwhelmed and/or buried by the broken justice system.  Likewise, no-one will be in any doubt that access to anything vaguely resembling ‘justice’ is rarely available to those who are indigent or of modest means.  Illusion of Justice clearly illustrates Jerry’s passsion for the rights of the many who are marginalised and brutalised by a class-based pejorative legal system that effectively functions exclusively for those who would have great difficulty fitting through the eye of a needle.

There will be no doubt in anyone’s mind, including even the myre of Ken Kratz’s psyche, that Jerry Buting has always believed in the innocence of Steven Avery and his nephew, Brendan Dassey and has not faltered in his efforts to keep their cause in the public domain, both before and after the groundbreaking Netflix docu-series.  Jerry’s cause is not limited to just two defendants, he seeks to effect real change in a broken system and he is in it for the long run:

“…in my work as criminal defence lawyer, I still cover long distances.  Yes, some cases are sprints, or middle distances.  Yet in others, getting justice is a journey that spans decades.  Once I get started, I keep going.  It turns out that there is really no choice”

Illusion of Justice: Inside Making a Murderer and America’s Broken System by Jerome F Buting can be purchased on Amazon.com via this link or through Amazon.co.uk and at most book shops.  Jerry is a shareholder in the Buting, Williams & Stilling, SC, law firm in Brookfield, Wisconsin and also has a Twitter account where one can get a variety of snapshots of his legal work, life and worldview.

DEFENCE-LAWYER-JERRY-BUTING

Reporter (2007): So do you think there’s a killer out there that the police have not caught?

Jerry Buting: Absolutely, I mean, that’s been our position all Along!

 (Illusion of Justice: Inside Making A Murderer And America’s Broken system)

By
Alex McGuigan, Belfast

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